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The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights #2020

The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights By William P. Jones The March on Washington Jobs Freedom and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights It was the final speech of a long day August when hundreds of thousands gathered on the Mall for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom In a resounding cadence Martin Luther King Jr
  • Title: The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights
  • Author: William P. Jones
  • ISBN: 9780393349412
  • Page: 325
  • Format: Paperback
  • The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights By William P. Jones It was the final speech of a long day, August 28, 1963, when hundreds of thousands gathered on the Mall for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom In a resounding cadence, Martin Luther King Jr lifted the crowd when he told of his dream that all Americans would join together to realize the founding ideal of equality The power of the speech created an enduring symbIt was the final speech of a long day, August 28, 1963, when hundreds of thousands gathered on the Mall for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom In a resounding cadence, Martin Luther King Jr lifted the crowd when he told of his dream that all Americans would join together to realize the founding ideal of equality The power of the speech created an enduring symbol of the march and the larger civil rights movement King s speech still inspires us fifty years later, but its very power has also narrowed our understanding of the march In this insightful history, William P Jones restores the march to its full significance The opening speech of the day was delivered by the leader of the march, the great trade unionist A Philip Randolph, who first called for a march on Washington in 1941 to press for equal opportunity in employment and the armed forces To the crowd that stretched than a mile before him, Randolph called for an end to segregation and a living wage for every American Equal access to accommodations and services would mean little to people, white and black, who could not afford them Randolph s egalitarian vision of economic and social citizenship is the strong thread running through the full history of the March on Washington Movement It was a movement of sustained grassroots organizing, linked locally to women s groups, unions, and churches across the country Jones s fresh, compelling history delivers a new understanding of this emblematic event and the broader civil rights movement it propelled.
    The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights By William P. Jones
    • [PDF] ↠ The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights | BY ☆ William P. Jones
      325 William P. Jones
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      Posted by:William P. Jones
      Published :2020-06-11T05:25:11+00:00

    About "William P. Jones"

    1. William P. Jones

      William P Jones, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, is a specialist in civil rights and labor history and contributes to The Nation and other publications He and his family live in Madison, Wisconsin.

    403 Comments

    1. This much anticipated book delivers an excellent account of the long term political networks that made the 1963 March on Washington to successful Euchner s People s History of the March on Washington recounts that day s events in greater detail and authors like Berber cover the concept of marching on Washington quite well Jones nicely adds to this discussion A Philip Randolph is rightly placed at the center of the story, and Jones skillfully puts the work of women like Anna Hedgeman and Pauli Mu [...]


    2. This month, August, 2013, marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington of August 28, 1963, a watershed in the struggle for civil rights Many cities will commemorate the March, which drew over 250,000 participants, including Washington, D.C where the March took place The March is best remembered for Martin Luther King s concluding I Have a Dream speech, which offered a vision of hope for brotherhood and peace in an interracial United States There is much to the March and its history tha [...]


    3. This is an excellent one volume history that puts the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in the larger context of Afro American activism especially within the labor movement Voices long forgotten and personalities long ignored are revitalized and reanimated The solidarity and fissures of the movement are presented clearly and unambiguously as are the hopes and disappointments It also places Dr Martin Luther King, Jr s speech at the March correctly as the culmination of a series of spe [...]


    4. This book nicely dovetails with both the anniversary of the march on Washington as well as labor day weekend Jones details the often forgotten role that A Phillip Randolph and the black labor movements played in creating the thrust that helped make this historic event happen Jones gives great detail of Randolph s first proposed march on Washington in 1941 that he used to force Roosevelt to desegregate the defense industry From there he details the rise of black union power in the face of a segre [...]


    5. For most Americans, the March on Washington centers almost completely on Martin Luther King s I Have a Dream speech Yet, Dr King was the LAST speaker in a event filled day, capping some six hours of speeches and music Jones places this event squarely in the history of African American movements and re focuses on the struggle to achieve equality in jobs, voting and housing For me, this was a sad book because so much of what those thousands upon thousands of people marched and fought for remains u [...]


    6. The best single volume of history about the importance of August 28, 1963 March on Washington Jones charts the events and efforts that led up to that powerful day in painstaking detail The book shows that the quest for civil rights in terms of racial equality was also always about creating a sense of economic fairness in one of the wealthiest country s of all time It is easily one of the best works of non fiction published in 2013 and for those wanting to know about that historic day there is n [...]


    7. An informative book I never knew the movement started so many years before the 1963 march I never knew who were the movers and shakers I never knew MLK was such a latecomer Like other folks, his was the only speech I heard and suspected this was what the movement was about I learned a lot reading this book and congratulate the author for tackling such a momentous work I was reading about James Madison and the Making of America at the same time WOW, what an interesting pair to read at once.


    8. More survey than in depth analysis, at times this book reads like a regurgitation of facts than a cohesive narrative I liked that Dr Jones went beyond MLK to put the March on Washington into a historical context, but the book lacks a strong central core to help ground the story and pull everything together This book is a good addition to Civil Rights history, but for all but the most dedicated scholars, I d recommend watching PBS s one hour documentary The March instead, which covers a lot of t [...]


    9. It s rare that I would review a book before getting to the halfway mark, but this is truly an excellent picture of the March on Washington as a radical movement The historian language necessitates reading some passages than once, but it s time well spent Check out the author s article for Dissent mag dissentmagazine articl


    10. I m sorry, I know many people really liked this book but I just could not get into it It is too textbook ish for me I liked that this book didn t just focus on Martin Luther King, Jr but the greater historical context was too dry for me I think there could have been a way to incorporate a central narrative into his list of facts that would have made this book palatable for me Like I said, a good text for Civil Rights scholars but not for you re average citizen.


    11. Extremely illuminating I should probably be embarrassed to admit how little I actually knew about the Civil Rights Movement, its origins, and its goals, but I think Jones absolves readers of this and acknowledges that I m not unique in my ignorance What we think we know and what we learn in school is only a tiny sliver of the whole story Obviously, it is extremely relevant at this point in history.


    12. It s easy to get lost in this book with all the acronyms, unions, and new names, but it is worth it to push through Jones reminds the reader of the often forgotten ignored economic struggled that was deeply connected to the Civil Rights Movement as well as the original March set in the 1940s Excellent read.



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