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Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life #2020

Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life By Steven Shapin Simon Schaffer Leviathan and the Air Pump Hobbes Boyle and the Experimental Life Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer have ventured beyond ordinary history of science or history of ideas to produce a novel exercise in the sociology of scientific knowledge a historical study rich in ne
  • Title: Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life
  • Author: Steven Shapin Simon Schaffer
  • ISBN: 9780691024325
  • Page: 232
  • Format: Paperback
  • Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life By Steven Shapin Simon Schaffer Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer have ventured beyond ordinary history of science or history of ideas to produce a novel exercise in the sociology of scientific knowledge a historical study rich in new interpretations and notable for the use of sources of a kind not hitherto fully exploited by scholars Clive Holmes, American Historical Review Shapin and Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer have ventured beyond ordinary history of science or history of ideas to produce a novel exercise in the sociology of scientific knowledge a historical study rich in new interpretations and notable for the use of sources of a kind not hitherto fully exploited by scholars Clive Holmes, American Historical Review Shapin and Schaffer work out the implications of these debates between Hobbes and Boyle for the history of science with great skill of interpretation and exposition They use their findings and their analysis to give an explanation of the experimental enterprise in general, which, although it is not philosophical in nature, always takes philosophy most seriously This is simply one of the most original, enjoyable and important books published in the history of science in recent years Owen Hannaway, Technology and Culture If any proof of the intellectual buoyancy or intrinsic worth of the history and philosophy for science was needed, nothing better could be provided than this study by Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer Their findings suggest the futility of wrenching science from its ideological context, and not only with respect to the seventeenth century they also detect parallels with the crisis of confidence affecting contemporary science Charles Webster, The Times Literary Supplement
    Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life By Steven Shapin Simon Schaffer Leviathan Leviathan Hobbes book SparkNotes Leviathan Summary Behemoth and leviathan creation Behemoth and leviathan, the two enigmatic animals mentioned in the book of Job, are commonly equated with a hippopotamus and a crocodile, respectively Exegesis of Job and indicates that a hippopotamus and a crocodile are not likely candidates for these enormous creatures described by Job. Leviathan Obey Me Wiki Fandom Leviathan Definition and Meaning Bible Dictionary For a discussion of the behemoth and leviathan as mythical creatures, see EB, under the word Behemoth and Leviathan. The points in the description which may well apply to the crocodile are the great invulnerability, the strong and close scales, the limbs and the teeth.
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      Published :2019-08-27T16:02:21+00:00

    About "Steven Shapin Simon Schaffer"

    1. Steven Shapin Simon Schaffer

      Shapin was trained as a biologist at Reed College and did graduate work in genetics at the University of Wisconsin before taking a Ph.D in the History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania in 1971.From 1972 to 1989, he was Lecturer, then Reader, at the Science Studies Unit, Edinburgh University, and, from 1989 to 2003, Professor of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego, before taking up an appointment at the Department of the History of Science at Harvard He has taught for brief periods at Columbia University, Tel Aviv University, and at the University of Gastronomic Sciences in Pollenzo, Italy In 2012, he was the S T Lee Visiting Professorial Fellow, School of Advanced Study, University of London.He has written broadly on the history and sociology of science Among his concerns are scientists, their ethical choices, and the basis of scientific credibility He revisioned the role of experiment by examining where experiments took place and who performed them He is credited with restructuring the field s approach to big issues in science such as truth, trust, scientific identity, and moral authority The practice of science, both conceptually and instrumentally, is seen to be full of social assumptions Crucial to their work is the idea that science is based on the public s faith in it This is why it is important to keep explaining how sound knowledge is generated, how the process works, who takes part in the process and how His books on 17th century science include the classic book Leviathan and the Air Pump Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life 1985, with Simon Schaffer his path breaking book A Social History of Truth 1994 , The Scientific Revolution 1996, now translated into 18 languages , and, on modern entrepreneurial science, The Scientific Life 2008 A collection of his essays is Never Pure 2010 His current research interests include the history of dietetics and the history and sociology of taste and subjective judgment, especially in relation to food and wine.He is a regular contributor to the London Review of Books and he has written for Harper s Magazine and The New Yorker.

    747 Comments

    1. So the three stars here is deceptive What I really need are two separate ratings, one of which would get 1 star, the other of which would get 5 stars Lets begin with the whining The book is dreadfully boring and at times disgustingly poorly written There were descriptions of various machines and theories and ideas that I could not comprehend after reading them 10 times in a row And these are descriptions of basic physical movements that in theory were aided by the diagrams that they included tha [...]


    2. A Moral Machine Measuring the characteristics of Airin Experiment and in Society an open liberal society was the natural habit of science, taken as the quest for objective knowledge Such Knowledge, in turn, constituted one of the sureties for the continuance of open and liberal society Interfere with the one, and you will erode the other Shapin and Schaffer, 1989 343 Britain was filled with controversy in the 1660 s Following a period of civil war, much of Britain was in the process of rebuildin [...]


    3. This is a curious book Enormously influential across multiple disciplines, and often cited as one of the books that started the science wars, the bulk of the text is in fact mostly concerned with a microscopic analysis of the dispute between Hobbes and Boyle over the legitimacy of the experimental approach to natural philosophy promoted by the newly founded Royal Society In particular, the focus is on the experiments with the air pump promoted by Boyle and his colleagues as emblematic of a new w [...]


    4. Today Boyle is considered the forefather of the experimental method, and Hobbes a titan of political philosophy This is an artifact of history, as the two were contemporaries and competitors in that strange space called Natural Philosophy One of the most important books in the history of science and in STS, Leviathan and the Air Pump looks at the early days of the Royal Society as a constitutional moment In the controversy over the air experiments, the integrity of the machine, the nature of the [...]


    5. Aside from its turgid composition and poor cross correlation, the material is fairly well discussed and presented.The level of insight is frequently obliterated by a periodic vapidity but occasionally a striking measure off insight and association sneaks through After reading this I well understand why so many critics say that science writing is flat awful, although in this case it is history of science How something as exciting as the experimentation of the early Royal Society in association wi [...]


    6. Marred by a writing style that is opaque, so I can t recommend it for the general reader But a truly profound and important book.If a non specialist wants to know what Shapin is all about, I d recommend starting with A Social History of Truth.


    7. A Summary This book examines how the rules of the scientific method were established by Boyle Hobbes protested about much than the science He believed that Boyle s science would disrupt the social order Their point is that facts are not simply revealed by nature Instead facts are only a posteriori linked to nature Scientific facts are established by extrascientific debate Boyle claimed that his experiments with the air pump were public, accessible to all, and open to replication This was the de [...]


    8. I m almost not giving this stars because I m in no position to do so Read this in graduate school and all I remember is this takeaway seemingly natural and systemic transmission of knowledge is neither natural nor systemic and that even the way we think of the inherent rightness of the scientific method has many problems.


    9. A riveting account of the debate between Hobbes and Boyle over the appropriate means of establishing matters of fact.


    10. This is the first book in STS that I ve read that doesn t really skimp on philosophy I understand that Kuhn is a historian, but Shapin and Schaffer manage to show that the two accounts are not only not exclusive, but that they re deeply interdependent The book, for those unfamiliar, focuses on the creature of what is basically British scientific empiricism and the experimental programme that developed in England during the 17th century prior even to Hume in response to the context of the Reforma [...]


    11. I m only halfway through this, and it s difficult to read because the UMD library copy is missing, so I have to read chapters at a time at the Library of Congress But this is one of the best books I ve ever read fictional or non a compelling, impossibly sophisticated account of history, science, philosophy, and epistemology A continuing project of Shapin, he hopes to tease out what we now call knowledge based on its originating arguments The writers find a helpful debate and metaphor for their p [...]


    12. Une excellent exemple de ce que le constructivisme social peut amener la philosophie des sciences ce titre, le chapitre 2, qui porte sur les modes de constitution des faits , est exemplaire Les auteurs y analysent de mani re convaincante le caract re original de la conception de la science qu avait Robert Boyle et montrent bien que la technologie mat rielle est loin d tre le seul outil n cessaire l tablissement des faits.Bien s r, la lecture du livre, on peut parfois sentir combien une approche [...]


    13. Shapin and Schaffer look at a key debate in the history of science, notably the 17th century dispute between the proto chemist Robert Boyle and the philosopher Thomas Hobbes over the nature of the vacuum and whether a new device the air pump can actually achieve one Using this debate as a case study, Shapin and Schaffer peel apart what it means to develop scientific facts, how evidence does or does not convince, the role of political context, and the relative merits and deficits to inductive and [...]


    14. This was a fantastic, insightful read that combines elements of moral philosophy, science, epistemology, ontology, empiricism, social order, assent Absolutely loved this The last few pages draw home the takeaway nicely that the debates between Hobbes and Boyle reflect social and scientific issues issues relating knowledge, philosophy, religion, experiment, and governance that remain pressing today The attention to historical detail combined with the attention to intellectual insight was particul [...]


    15. As we come to recognize the conventional and artifactual status of our forms of knowing, we put ourselves in a position to realize that it is ourselves and not reality that is responsible for what we know Knowledge, as much as the state, is the product of human actions Hobbes was right.Non completamente condivisibile, forse, ma incredibilmente stimolante.


    16. This book is a tsunami of historical information While I wasn t terribly interested in the minutiae of history, I was very interested in the author s own synthesis of what it means Unfortunately, such moments of digested insight are buried within the tome like diamonds in a deep mine It took quite a bit of perseverance, but I feel I came out far richer in the end.


    17. The form of life in which we make our scientific knowledge will stand or fall with the way we order our affairs of state Knowledge, as much as the state, is the product of human actions Hobbes was right.









    18. Interesting study of the Enlightenment controversy over scientific knowledge and procedures, specifically the conflict between Hobbes absolutism and Boyle s experimental model.


    19. Impressive scholarship and a fundamentally interesting central thesis about political structures and scientific knowledge, but drags on and becomes somewhat repetitive.


    20. Certainly not a casual read, but Shapin s work made me re evaluate the fundamental basis of modern science the experiment And honestly, that s pretty impressive.


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